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Posts Tagged ‘michael connelly’

Sisters in Crime/Los Angeles Presents LAst Resort by Matt Coyle, Mary Marks, Patricia Smiley and Michael Connelly (Introduction)

Reviewed by Lisa Brown-Gilbert

Last ResortSince 1997, Sisters in Crime has published anthologies of members’ crime fiction works. Each collection was well received with their newest addition, The LAst Resort as no exception. A stunningly extraordinary collection of fiction shorts, the book overall, combines elements that make for a deliciously wicked elixir of potently intriguing portrayals of lives at their last resort, near drowning, immersed in the murky waters of the underbelly of morality that thrives in Los Angeles. Read the rest of this entry »

The Wrong Side of Goodbye (A Harry Bosch Novel) by Michael Connelly

Reviewed by Allen Hott

The Wrong Side of GoodbyeHarry Bosch, one of Connelly’s (and my) favorites is back. The retired police detective cannot stay out of the mix when it comes to hunting for bad guys or as in this story just plain hunting.

Click Here for More Information on The Wrong Side of Goodbye

Harry is working as an extra for the San Fernando Police Department. It isn’t full time and he doesn’t really get paid much but it keeps him busy and happy. He still pursues other cases as a private investigator.

And in that position this time he really gets a boomer! A very, very rich old gentleman, Whitney Vance, contacts Harry and pays him ten thousand dollars to find a possible missing heir. Vance owns/runs one of the largest businesses in California and supposedly has no potential heirs that are related to him. But he believes that he might and he wants to find out. He impregnated a Mexican girl when he was young and his parents would not allow him to have anything to do with her. Vance was forced to move away and go to a different school and as far as he knew his father somehow managed to send her away perhaps to Mexico. Read the rest of this entry »

The Crossing (Bosch) by Michael Connelly

Reviewed by Allen Hott

The CrossingEven though he is retired, Harry Bosch is the best “catcher” of bad guys known to man! At least that is what Michael Connelly (and I) both think.

In this really great story Harry pairs up with his half-brother, Mickey Haller also known as the Lincoln Lawyer as he usually works from his car rather than from an office. Haller is known throughout Connelly’s stories as the somewhat shifty but still truthful criminal defense lawyer. Harry and Mickey usually at least would be working on opposite sides of the legal system. Harry trying to put the bad guys away and Mickey trying to prove that even if they did do the bad deed they had “legal” rights that should protect them. Read the rest of this entry »

The Burning Room by Michael Connelly (Review #2)

The Burning RoomThis is a MUST read for any suspense or crime reader.

Almost ready for retirement, Harry Bosch, a good detective, is given a new rookie partner, Lucia Soto, who has good credentials but no experience at the level Bosch has.  As it turns out Soto has a very good mind and proves it with her actions and follow through.  She learned fast and became a huge help to Bosch in solving a cold case that no one else even came close to finding the culprits.  But this cold case led Lucia to a bad killer of a fire in a children’s home in which she had been in at the earlier time.  That fire had killed many children and Soto wanted vengeance to the killers involved.<!–more–>

Many other twists and turns occur that will keep you in this book. I knew when I saw Connelly’s name on a new book that it would delight most all readers.  Please don’t miss this book.  I purchased the paperback copy.

The Burning Room by Michael Connelly

The Burning RoomReviewed by Allen Hott

Harry Bosch, Detective Supreme, gets teamed up with a new partner who though a young woman has already been touted as being a true up and coming police officer. Harry finds out early on that his new partner has been commended for coming to the aid of a previous partner by using her weapon quickly and correctly in Harry’s eyes.

In true Connelly fashion the author has constructed a really great story about how these two cops work together on solving not one but two unsolved crimes from years past. They were given one to work that involved a shooting some twenty years ago but as good detectives they also along the way begin solving another old one.

Harry finds out early on that his new partner was very involved in one of the old crimes but not in the way you would think. She was actually a victim of sorts in a fire that took place in a building that housed the day care center that she attended as a very young girl. Read the rest of this entry »

The Gods of Guilt (Lincoln Lawyer) by Michael Connelly

The Gods of GuiltReviewed by Allen Hott

Mickey Haller is back! One of Connelly’s favorite characters is Mickey Haller who is also more widely known as the Lincoln Lawyer. Why you ask? Because Haller does not have a real office although he is a widely known defense lawyer in the LA area. No office at all. He works out of the back of a Lincoln Town Car that is usually driven by Earl Briggs who works for Haller in various ways besides being a driver.

Lately times have been tough for Haller and his small group as there has been few real cases. Mostly right now they are working foreclosures and the pay for that is minimal to say the least. The book starts out as Haller leaves court where his latest client didn’t walk but was granted a mistrial because of a ploy that Haller used to avoid his client being put away for sure. Read the rest of this entry »

The Black Box by Michael Connelly

The Black BoxReviewed by Allen Hott

Detective Harry Bosch of the LAPD is one of Michael Connelly’s favorite characters. It is amazing to me how every time I read a Connelly/Bosch book I picture Fred Dryer as Harry Bosch in my mind. Dryer was a professional football player who went on to become a very well-known and skilled actor. One of his shows in the 80s was “Hunter” in which he played a character similar to Harry Bosch. Thus the association I assume.

In The Black Box Connelly begins with Bosch working the LA riots of 1992. And in so doing Bosch comes across a very pretty blonde girl lying dead in an alley in the heart of the riot area. Somewhat stunned by the appearance of a white girl in this area Bosch checks her body for identification and finds a press pass issued to Anneke Jespersen. Bosch tries to do some investigating but the entire area was quickly cleared by the National Guard as they moved forward trying to stop the rioting. Bosch was able to keep a shell casing that he found along with some pictures that he quickly took.

Twenty years later with the girl’s body still framed in his mind Bosch while working gets assigned to her murder as an Unsolved Case. And this is something he has dreamed about. He felt as if he had not done his job years ago so this will be atonement. Read the rest of this entry »

The Poet by Michael Connelly

The Poet Reviewed by Allen Hott

If you have never read this book, get it and read it. Without a doubt this may have been Michael Connelly at his best (and his best is not reached by many writers in today’s writing world). The story that he started with The Poet transcended into several more of his books but the original really put it all into motion.

Jack McEvoy is a crime reporter who works for the Rocky Mountain News but he always has visions of more. Either a similar job with one of the bigger newspapers in L.A., New York, or Chicago or else to someday finish the book he has written. If he could get one book published then he is certain he could move up in his journalistic field of endeavor.

However the immediate future is extremely clouded. Two detectives from the Denver Police Department have just informed him that Sean, his brother, is dead. Jack and Sean, though twins, are not overly close. Not at this time anyway. Throughout their lives they have been in and out of the closeness thing. However Jack is still shocked and he begins to look into how and why Sean died.

All things point to suicide, even to the leaving behind of a few poetic lines as a suicide note. But to Jack it just doesn’t ring true so he begins to go deeper and deeper into the whole death thing. Read the rest of this entry »

The Drop by Michael Connelly (Review #2)

The Drop Reviewed by Allen Hott

For those of us who are Michael Connelly/Harry Bosch fans The Drop comes as bit of a shock. In the vernacular of the LAPD the DROP means Deferred Retirement Option Plan. And in the case of Harry Bosch, Connelly’s favorite detective, DROP means the end of his career. Needless to say Bosch is not at all in favor of the DROP in his case. But since he is put on it and because of certain circumstances has only 39 months left in his career instead of the 60 months that are generally given. He retired once before and he was not able to live with it and now he is not looking forward to it. He decides that he will go out with a bang and work as many cases as they will give to him.

The morning after he is given the news of the DROP situation he is given two new cases to work. The first one is based on DNA being matched from a 1989 rape and murder to a recently convicted twenty-nine year old rapist. Sounds like a slam dunk until Harry realizes if the accused is 29 today he would have been only 8 at the time of the rape. Somewhere there is a problem. Either with the work out of the Crime Lab that did the analysis of the DNA or something else. Harry has to find out the real story behind this one. Read the rest of this entry »

The Fifth Witness by Michael Connelly

The Fifth Witness Reviewed by Allen Hott

Yep, the recession hurt everyone. And that includes Mickey Haller, the criminal defense lawyer in Los Angeles. So much so did the recession hurt that Haller began chasing down wrongful foreclosures. At least in his mind and in his methodology Haller felt that many foreclosures were definitely illegal. With that in mind he began defending many of these folks so that they could keep their homes at least for a spell while either they earned more to be able to make their payments or the bank figured out some other way to fight Haller’s methods.

Strangely enough one of his foreclosure clients quickly became one of his criminal defense clients when the lady was accused of murder. Lisa Trammel, the client, was arrested rather quickly when one of the top men at the bank who foreclosed upon her was shot and killed in the bank’s parking garage.

Trammel had built quite a reputation for herself somewhat similar to the Occupy “Whatever” folks have done. In her case she built a tremendous following by picketing outside the bank, appearing on every type of media broadcast that she was able to, and she even had put together a website extolling the good things about the poor people that the bad banks were foreclosing upon. Lisa had been a high school teacher and her husband was a BMW salesman. However when their loan (which had been sold back and forth several times by banks and financial wizards) ballooned and then went into default her husband left her and headed to Mexico. Read the rest of this entry »