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Posts Tagged ‘john grisham’

The Rooster Bar by John Grisham

Reviewed by Allen Hott

The Rooster BarWriting about young law students or those just recently admitted to the bar has always been a good stomping ground for Grisham. And The Rooster Bar really fills the bill!

A group of law students attending Foggy Bottom Law School basically get together on several evening meetings and begin discussing the Foggy Bottom Law School. One of them especially has been looking into some strange things about the school as far as placement of graduates and also failure rates etc. He is determined that something is not right so he tells his two buddies and his girlfriend that he is putting together a study to either prove or disprove his theory.

Basically he finds in his studies that the bulk of the lower rated law schools, such as Foggy Bottom, not only produce fewer top graduates. But also strangely enough many of these lower rated schools appear to be owned by a group of industrialists who would not appear to have any interest particularly in further education and definitely not in law degrees. No one takes his findings too seriously but he continues with his theories. Read the rest of this entry »

The Whistler by John Grisham

Reviewed by Allen Hott

The WhistlerI would say this is Grisham’s best but I believe I say that after each of his books that I read. But truthfully this is a tremendous read. He always does a great job writing about the courts and trials but this one like some others goes into a lot of detail about the happenings outside the courthouse.

Lacy Stoltz, a lawyer working as an investigator for the Florida Board on Judicial Conduct, is sent on a possible case by her boss. She and Hugo, her partner, meet up with a guy who is definitely hiding as he uses aliases and lives on a boat. Greg Myers, the man they meet, is asking them to file a claim under the Florida Whistleblower Statue for a client of his. Myers is very close mouthed and doesn’t give up the names of his client or his client’s “mole”. However he truly believes that there is a mob known as the Catfish Mafia that is committing crimes across a huge part of the Gulf coastal area and that they also control a female judge of high ranking in the area.

They report back to their boss with the information and he tells them as long as Myers signs a valid complaint they will take on the case. They both feel that the FBI or someone should be involved since it appears the entire situation includes a casino on Indian tribal property which is basically “hands-off” from local police enforcement.

Myers does sign the complaint and gives them more interesting information which gets them going rather quickly into checking out some of the claims that he has made. They quickly find a lot of evidence that this judge, Claudia McDover, has been involved in many, many cases for the Tappacola Reservation and the new casino. Much legal work had to be done, some somewhat sketchy and questionable, to get land rights waived and road construction performed whether or not it was really necessary for the entire area. And McDover seemed to steam roll the proceedings along in favor of the Indians. Both investigators still want Myers or their boss to agree to calling in the FBI because of the depth of the charges but until they get more evidence their boss says no. And Myers has staunchly said no all along until they get more deeply involved

That happens especially after they meet with one of the Tappacola tribe whose brother is in prison for a murder which appears to have been committed by someone else!

It isn’t too long after that a horrible “accident” occurs when Lacy and Hugo are on their way to meet what they believe to be another mole connected to the case based on the phone call they receive.

As usual with Grisham however he plays down the romantic side of any of his stories and goes for the guts which always are how the law works and also how the criminal side of the particular story also works.

The Whistler really does go into depth into both of these sides as the story moves along. The reader gets a good view of what these criminal minds know and how they work when confronted with law enforcement.

And on the other side Grisham shows all the many tools that the FBI use to pull together evidence and expand upon it to really nail their target.

This is a terrific read and one that the reader has an extremely hard time laying aside to do anything else. It holds your interest and has you racing along to see what all will end up happening. Almost like gambling at a casino!!!

Grisham at his best! Thank you once more, Mr. Grisham!

Rogue Lawyer by John Grisham

Reviewed by Allen Hott

Sebastian Rudd who in fact is the Rogue Lawyer is a different sort of Rogue Lawyerand a completely different lawyer. He pretty much works as a public defender taking the cases that no other lawyer usually wants. He defends those that he believes are innocent or at least they have had their cases distorted by police and courts that are just looking for someone to take the blame in cases they have a hard time solving.

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The first case involves a young man who fits the bill of a down and out no- account who likely could have done the deed he is accused of. However Rudd, unlike the rest of the little town, really believes that the man is not guilty. To prove it he needs to get the blood of the man he truly believes did the crime. By using a cage-fighter that he backs in fights and bets on, Rudd is able to get the blood sample matched as he needs and also luckily one member of the jury attempts to talk with him when he is at one of the weekly cage fights that he attends. These two events comprise the necessary steps that Rudd needs for a not guilty verdict. Read the rest of this entry »

Gray Mountain by John Grisham

Gray MountainReviewed by Allen Hott

One of the most interesting books that I have read in some time. Many of us are familiar with Grisham’s writings which mostly focus on attorneys and courtroom drama. Gray Mountain is pretty much along those lines but with twists and turns that make it even more appealing than usual.

Samantha Korver works as an attorney of a huge law firm in New York City. She is far from the top and is working hard to get there. Billing up to 70 hours per week to clients she does in fact put in more hours than that usually. However she has settled in and loves being in the big city. Read the rest of this entry »

Sycamore Row (Jake Brigance) by John Grisham

Sycamore RowReviewed by Allen Hott

There is no doubt that John Grisham is one of the top novelists of today but believe me Sycamore Row is just one more piece of proof of his greatness. Grisham is most adept at writing courtroom stories but he is so special in that he travels away from that area at times and when he does he excels in whatever area he enters.

Sycamore Row is indeed a courtroom drama with pages of happenings in the courtroom but it is also a really fantastic story of a group of characters in their daily lives and even in the lives of those who preceded that group. The story is about a southern attorney and the happenings as he works to defend a handwritten, not witnessed, will that has been mailed to him. Read the rest of this entry »

The Associate by John Grisham

The AssociateReviewed by Allen Hott

An intriguing story of monster law firms and how they operate. Perhaps not always on the up and up but always with growth in mind. They have the finances, know-how and personnel to pull off some unbelievable feats.

The Associate tells of a young man who has been an excellent student his entire life and now looks to get into the legal profession. He has been somewhat pulled in that direction because his father has run a successful business in a small town for many years. Although his father is a very good lawyer he has never attempted to become one of the “big boys” in his profession as he favors working with and for the people in a small town. He is well known, well liked, and makes a better than decent living in this small town. Read the rest of this entry »

The Partner by John Grisham

The PartnerReviewed by Allen Hott

Once in a while it is good to go to an old book by one of your favorite authors. In this case The Partner really filled the bill. This is one of Grisham’s that I never read and I do not know why but I do know that I put off reading a really great story for too long. As usual with many of Grisham’s stories it is centered around the Mississippi Gulf Coast and especially the Biloxi area. And pretty much as Grisham’s style it is also about lawyers and the courts.

Danilo Silva was finally located in a small town in Brazil when the hunters made their catch. He had been living rather humbly in a small house and basically blending into the neighborhood. However his living conditions were about to change drastically when they, after watching him for quite a period to insure he was their man, finally grabbed him off the path during one of his daily runs. Read the rest of this entry »

The Confession by John Grisham

The ConfessionReviewed by Allen Hott

An extremely well told story of how deeply involved some people can quickly get into others’ lives. Grisham has written a story that is not only about good people and good happenings but he has tempered it with sadness and terrible events. As usual he has written in such a way that the reader cannot put the book down but has to continue moving toward an ending which I am not even sure Grisham had envisioned when he began writing The Confession.

It seems very innocent and not out of the ordinary when a gentleman enters the office of Keith Schroeder, pastor of St Mark’s Lutheran Church in Kansas. He wants to speak to the pastor and the pastor’s wife, Dana Schroeder, after a few basic questions, escorts him into the pastor’s study. Read the rest of this entry »

The Racketeer by John Grisham

The RacketeerReviewed by Allen Hott

A very well thought out plot as usual by Mr. Grisham. This one, although it does somewhat involve the courts, is really more of a mystery as to how The Racketeer pulled off the caper and how is he going to get away with it. Or is he?

Malcolm Bannister is in fact that person. As the book opens he is in a Federal Prison camp in Maryland. Bannister is a lawyer who has served five years so far of a ten year sentence that he believes was handed down by a judge and district attorney who were looking to nail a true racketeer for money laundering. That guy set Bannister up by sending a fee payment of 4.5 million dollars instead of 450,000. When Bannister tried to return the overpayment the group with the racketeer and their bank refused the repayment. Then when they were quickly busted for money laundering they easily implicated Bannister. The DA and judge decided they were all guilty so away to prison Bannister went.

Sometimes bad things turn out good and perhaps that is what happens to Bannister. He is known as a jailhouse lawyer and makes many new friends or business acquaintances through his background. One of them turns out to be Quinn Rucker who, like Bannister, is a black man, serving time for distributing drugs. The two become quite friendly and learn a lot about each other. Read the rest of this entry »

The Litigators: A Novel by John Grisham

The LitigatorsReviewed by Allen Hott

No doubt this guy can write. If he cannot hold your interest with his descriptions, legal terminology, great characters, and tremendous story lines I am afraid you are not truly a reader.

As usual Grisham has written about lawyers, their trials and tribulations. In this case it begins with an attorney quitting his job with a high powered, multi-lawyered law firm. Exactly how he quits his job and how he leaves is one of the best introductions to a novel. The reason he left was because of the hours and pressure. Making good money but working himself to death and ignoring his wife and hoped for family.

That attorney, David Zinc, managed to spot a billboard sign for a law firm named Finley & Figg. Owned by Oscar Finley and Wally Figg, the firm basically was an ambulance chasing small time firm with basically no staff, no major clients, and no foreseeable improvement in business in the future. David quickly works his way in and becomes a third man to the team of Oscar and Wally. He has a pretty good sized nest egg saved up and convinces his wife that he just wants to give a shot to this idea of working and perhaps becoming a partner in a smaller law firm. He is fed up with the big firms and their wearing out junior staff partners. Read the rest of this entry »