The Body in the Casket: A Faith Fairchild Mystery (Faith Fairchild Mysteries) by Katherine Hall Page

Reviewed by Vickie Dailey

The Body in the CasketThis is the 24th installment in the Faith Fairchild mystery series. The third of which that I have read and reviewed. It is always a pleasure to read one of the Faith Fairchild mysteries. They are cleverly written and an enjoyable way to pass a couple of hours.

This story was quite intriguing as Faith is hired to cater a birthday party for a retired Broadway producer’s 70th birthday party at an exclusive manor house. The invited guests were all involved in the biggest flop the producer had. Faith is not only hired for her culinary skills, but her sleuthing skills as well.

The producer believes one of the guests is trying to kill him. While Faith plans a delicious menu (recipes at back of book) she uses her sleuthing skills via internet as to who would be most likely the killer.

I will tell you that I didn’t see it coming. I highly recommend this as a great read.

Pacific Homicide A Mystery (A Pacific Homicide) by Patricia Smiley

Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

Pacific HomicidePacific Homicide introduces LAPD Homicide Detective Davie (Davina) Richards, a newly promoted office with a reputation for getting the job done no matter what it takes. She is also the daughter of a former LAPD officer whose last case led to the embarrassment of the District Attorney who now oversees “officer involved shootings.” This sets up the first of two plots in Pacific Homicide.

While her dad is now retired, the attorney has set his sights on Davie as a way to get his personal revenge for his embarrassment. Before her promotion, Davie shot a suspect to save her partner’s life. The shooting was ruled justifiable, but now, the DA has reopened the investigation of the shooting.

The first case she catches in homicide as lead detective is of a badly decomposed body of a woman found in the sewer system. The case leads Davie into the world of Ukrainian immigrants which although not a new plot in crime fiction is done well in Pacific Homicide. Read the rest of this entry »

Nothing Stays Buried (A Monkeewrench Novel) by P.T. Tracy

Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

Nothing Stays BuriedHomicide detectives Leo Magozzi and Gino Rolseth are called to the scene of a murder in a park where a young woman is found strangled. A playing card has been left on her body. Before long, the detectives realize their murder is probably tied to another where a card was also left with the body. Because of the face of the cards are two numbers apart, they fear there are yet two more victims. Are their bodies yet to be found or were their cases investigated without anything tipping off they were tied to a bigger crime wave?

Meanwhile, the Monkeewrench Crew has been asked to investigate the disappearance of a young woman on her way to visit her father in rural Minnesota. Her car was found near the road, the dogs picked up her scent but lost it at a tree in the woods where her ring was found. Had she left the ring as a clue to let people know she had been there? Read the rest of this entry »

An Aegean April (Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis Mysteries) by Jeffrey Siger

Reviewed by Caryn St. Clair

An Aegean AprilChief Inspector Andreas Kaldis returns in his ninth case when he is asked to investigate the murder of a well known and respected citizen on the island of Lesvos. Lesvos is the destination for many of the refugees passing though Turkey on their way to Northern Europe, and the small island is overwhelmed with the numbers. The murder victim, Mihalis Volandes, thought he had a solution for the refugee problem, however he was having trouble getting anyone with authority to listen. The night he was killed-slaughtered really outside his home, a young man, Ali Sera, a refugee himself, had received a message asking him to meet with the victim at Volandes home. When he arrived, he found the victim sliced nearly in half. When the police arrived, they found a bloody Sera standing near the body.

Chief Inspector Kaldis is asked to look into the crime since while Sera was at the scene, much of the evidence doesn’t support him as the murderer. Read the rest of this entry »

Occasional Crimes: A Thriller by Tucker Edwards

Reviewed by Suzanne Odom

Occasional CrimesWhat begins as an ordinary surfing trip to South America turns into something far more thrilling for three college students from California. Tim, Lee, and Chuck are college friends about to graduate. All have a passion for surfing and are always looking for the next big wave. Disenchanted about looking for a job after graduation, Tim and his friends decide to take one last big surfing trip. They make plans to go surfing in Mexico and possibly in Costa Rica and Nicaragua at the end of the summer. This should be a fun experience, giving them the chance to ride the best waves and hang out together.

Soon August rolls around, and it is almost time to leave for their trip. Tim buys a new truck and has a camper put on the back, so they can campout as they travel. Right before they leave, Tim meets a girl and they begin to date. She is as passionate about surfing as he is, and they agree to keep in touch while he is away. The three friends set out on their trip, excited about the places they will visit. Read the rest of this entry »

Sunday Silence: A Novel (A Frieda Klein Novel) by Nicci French

Reviewed by Jud Hanson

Sunday SilenceFrieda Klein has had a long career as a successful psychotherapist and police consultant. Despite this, she fears it may all come to an end when a corpse is found under her floorboards. Klein is certain she knows who the killer is: a man who supposedly died seven years prior. However, when more bodies began to show up and two people close to Klein are kidnapped, it becomes uncertain as to whether it is the work of a copy cat or Klein’s old nemesis. Thus begins the race to find the culprit before anyone else falls victim.

Sunday Silence by Nicci French is the seventh entry in the Frieda Klein series. French has done a good job in creating a cast of characters that are both realistic and engaging, leaving the reader wanting more. Since this book was my introduction to both Nicci French and Frieda Klein, I am unable to compare it to the rest of the series. I can say that although I enjoyed the book overall, the ending left something to be desired. However, since it appears that the plot will actually be continued in a subsequent book, this is not necessarily a black mark. That said, I am looking forward to the next and am hopeful it will offer a believable resolution to this book’s unanswered questions. I would give this book 3/5 stars.

*A copy of this book was the only consideration given for this review.*

Silent Treatment by Michael Palmer

Reviewed by Allen Hott

Silent TreatmentThere is no doubt that this is a medical thriller but the reader must realize that a lot of the “thriller” is in fact only connected with “medical” in a general way. Yes there are some somewhat scary moments connected with the medical industry. But most of the thrills are as Dr. Harry Corbett and a few of his associates get involved in hunting for killers.

Corbett is a highly successful doctor who is well established and well liked in the hospital where he practices. He has also been married to the love of his life, though lately he is not necessarily the love of his wife’s life. There appear to be some things happening with her that he is not aware of, only that she has been acting strangely.

Evie, his wife, is scheduled early on in the story for a minor repair on a small problem with her heart. The doctors have all convinced them that it is nothing to be concerned about but Corbett is still worried. Read the rest of this entry »

The Last Mrs. Parrish by Liv Constantine

Reviewed by Teri Davis

The Last Mrs. ParrishWho doesn’t want to be richer, thinner, blonde with blue-eyes, tanned, better looking and more successful? This seems to be the American dream for many women. Most wealthy people appear to have it all. With money, they can recreate themselves into almost the perfect person. Think of the numerous women and even many men who spend enormous amounts of money to achieve their vision of perfection.

The problem is often what appears in public is quite different than reality or in the privacy of a home.

Amber Patterson is tired of being normal. She is thin, but plain. Mousy brownish hair, dowdy, ambitious but in a career with no future for making real money. She just makes enough to get by with her paycheck to paycheck existence.

How can she change her life?

Amber finds a new friend, Daphne Parrish, who seems to be everything she could want. Daphne is beautiful, rich, blond, blue-eyes, married to a gorgeous husband and two young daughters. Amber wants Daphne life, but slightly changed without the children. She doesn’t enjoy young ones at all.

Coincidentally, both Daphne and Amber had sisters who dies due to cystic fibrosis. This is the foundation of their friendship.

Will Amber ever have a life like Daphne’s? Read the rest of this entry »

The Cold Kiss by John Rector (Review #2)

Reviewed by Nancy Eaton

The Cold KissI must admit there aren’t too many books that really grab my attention and keep hold of it all the way to the end. The Cold Kiss is an exception.

Nate and his pregnant girlfriend Sara leave Minnesota and plan to drive to Reno to get married and start a new life. They are both trying to forget their past lives and begin new ones.

When Nate and Sara stop at a diner, they noticed a man who had a terrible cough. As they were leaving the diner, the man confronted them and offered to pay $500 for a ride. Nate did not want to take the man in the car but Sara’s eyes lit up when she started thinking about what she could do with $500. So, against Nate’s judgment, they agreed to take Syl in their car. It started snowing.

Along the way, Syl sounded deathly sick with his constant coughing and even at times spitting up blood. The snowstorm got worse and Nate pulled into a motel. At first it didn’t look like the motel was open. When Nate turned to look at Syl, he believed he was dead in the backseat. Read the rest of this entry »

End Game (Will Robie Series) by David Baldacci

Reviewed by Allen Hott

End GameWill Robie and Jessica Reel, two of the top secret agents working for the U.S. government, are in it again. And this time they have to stay in the states and find their immediate superior.

However the book starts out with Robie battling a group of bad guys in Europe and Jessica doing the same in Iraq. Neither one have a problem doing that as it is their training.

But shortly after getting back they are given the information that Roger Walton, known as the Blue Man, their immediate superior is missing. It seems that Walton had gone back to Colorado where he lived for years while he was growing up. This time on his trip back he suddenly disappeared.

The area in Colorado today is pretty much inhabited by ne’er -do- wells. There are neo-Nazis, skinheads, and other slightly different groups of people settled in here. These folks appear to be battling each other but also causing some problems in the area. It hasn’t been enough to put anyone in jail but recently it seems that some folks have come up missing. And among that group of missing persons is Roger Walton!

The local law enforcement consists of a sheriff and a deputy. They do not appear to be too anxious to do anything as long as the laws are not broken. But on hearing of the missing FBI agent they immediately join up with Will and Jessica to help in any way they can. Read the rest of this entry »